Bay Area Disrupted: John Vanderslice

John Vanderslice spricht im Interview über sein rein analoges Tonstudio Tiny Telephone Studios in San Francisco. Als Musiker und Musikproduzent erlebt er den Wegzug vieler Musiker und Künstler aus der Stadt.

 

About Tiny Telephone Studios:

We at Tiny Telephone Recording, we enforce analog recording here, and that’s, like, where you’re recording on magnetic reels of tape – it’s linear. I really like that it [analog recording] encourages performances, and it encourages a very non-nervous approach, where musicians are actually listening to the impact of the music, without being able to access every ‘zero’ and ‘one’, because that makes people very nervous. The tape defends what a band has actually committed to. And also people play a lot better on tape because they know that their performances are not going to be altered. There is a red light that is on. They can see it from the glass. The adrenaline thing is totally different. I have recorded in other people’s studios on other people’s albums and I have been in mid take, and the engineer hits the space bar and says: „Okay, got it!“ And you are like: „OMG, he is going to loop the first part of what I just did.“ It’s a terrible feeling.

 

About inequality:

Part of what we are seeing in San Francisco is, crazy VC speculation fueled by capital gains rates that are too low and income tax rates that are too low. This is the way to create a Second-World country – you know, to have these massive divisions in wealth – that’s how empires fade. First, you over-expand, and then you allow divisions and class and stratified society to be further divided by not properly taxing rich people.

Like, remember Henry Ford – famous anti-semite union-breaker? At least, at one point, he said, ‘Hey, maybe I should raise wages because I want my employees to buy my cars,’ right? You know, at least he said that, you know what I mean? I don’t think that a lot of, like, today’s industrialists think that way (laughs), I just don’t, you know what I mean? Like, that’s kinda sad – that you look back at Henry Ford and think, ‘What a generous man.’

 

About musicians leaving San Francisco:

I mean, half my best friends have left San Francisco. I mean, it’s like mass exodus. The city is only allowing… they’re not allowing single-family residences to be built. They’re allowing high-rise apartment buildings to be put up, and those are not for middle class people (laughs). They’re really not. And they’re very expensive, and they’re all going up, down, you know, in South Beach or in downtown or in SoMa, so there’s really no housing inventory that’s being supplied to middle class, lower-middle class people.

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